SwitchMote available with PSU R3

The full SwitchMote kit is available again. I had to redesign the PSU cover and some 3D printed spacers which fit the new PSU R3. Everything is pretty much the same as before, except that there’s significantly less soldering to do. The PSU R3 is also available separately. All the small passives are now SMD soldered. There are now 4 screws that balance the cover a little better than before., and the FTDI programming header is offset from the edge.

You do the programming the same via an FTDI-Adapter and a double length male header which is provided in the kit.

SwitchMote PSU R3 release

The SwitchMote PSU is now at revision 3, here are the changes:

  • DC side is now SMD assembled, no more through hole components
  • 2OZ copper PCB
  • with the RECOM RAC02-05SGA there is no need for a fuse, only a MOV at 230V
  • although the DC side TVS footprint is left there, the specs of the AC-DC do not warrant a TVS on the DC side
  • same relay options as before – two 10A/250V relays or one 16A/250V relay
  • same control via AVR Moteino
  • optional footprint for ACS711 hall effect current sensor, this is experimental – it offers an analog output proportional to the AC current flowing through the SwitchMote relays. Adding this sensor requires cutting the main HOT trace where indicated and soldering solder jumpers on the bottom from the transducer’s DC side (isolated) to the Moteino side.
  • 4 symmetric mounting holes for a better enclosure – planning to make a 3D printed PETG enclosure and make the SwitchMote available with it

The kit will include the SMD assembled PCB along with the RECOM PSU, relays, MOV, screw terminal and headers. Optionally it can be ordered assembled at an additional cost.

New Moteino packages released for Arduino IDE

There is a new Moteino Arduino core package release (v1.4.0). If you’ve used the Moteino package so far with the Arduino IDE, you should get a little notice next time you start it up. By the way the link to the LowPowerLab package definition JSON is the same and should be pasted in your Preferences dialog under Boards Manager URLs:

Then you can either install or upgrade to the latest AVR package. Notice there is a brand new Moteino SAMD package with a new MoteinoM0 board as well, more on that in a separate post. Install/upgrade these in your Boards Manager:

These two packages includes a refined selection of taget boards:

  • [ Moteino / Moteino-USB ] – use this to send your sketch to a Moteino or MoteinoUSB
  • [ Moteino (8Mhz) ] – for 8Mhz Moteinos 
  • [ MightyHat ] – technically identical definition to Moteino but use this to target a MightyHat
  • [ MoteinoMEGA / MoteinoMEGA-USB ] – use this to program MoteinoMEGA or MoteinoMEGA-USB
  • [ MoteinoM0 ] – a new Moteino based on SAMD21 Cortex M0+!

Once the packages are installed or upgraded you should see these new boards in your Tools>Boards menu:

And if you’re using my custom IDE board/port shortcut bar add-on, you can quickly add and access them directly from a click of a button, no more searching in the mile long Boards submenu of doom:

Some notable changes in these new packages:

  • added standard LED_BUILTIN pin macro definitions for all boards, you can simply use this macro to address the onboard LED of any Moteino, no more need for specific checks of what board it is you’re targeting, the LED_BUILTIN will just work. This macro references D9 on 328P Moteinos and MightyHat, D15 on MoteinoMEGAs, and D13 on MoteinoM0, simply use this macro directly in your sketch:
  • added board macro definitions for all Moteino boards:
  • added SS_FLASHMEM macro pin definitions for all Moteinos, again this is to ease the use of the SPI CS/SS selection pin across all Moteino boards:

I hope you find these changes useful. There’s lot of work to be done to upgrade all the sketches in the RFM69 and SPIFlash libraries to make use of these new macros. Please report any issues and stay tuned for the coming updates on MoteinoM0!

RFM69 and SPIFlash libraries released via Arduino LibraryManager

The LowPowerLab RFM69 and SPIFlash libraries are now published to the Arduino Library directory, and available to install in the IDE’s Library Manager (under Tools>Manage Libraries). Note that if you already have these library installed manually, you may need to remove it and re-install using the manager:

As new versions are released, you can update to the latest or switch back to an older version if you have a need to do so. If you’re new to using the Library Manager, it’s worth to read the official Arduino Library guide, and also check the Library Manager FAQ, to understand how Arduino libraries work, and how manage them (adding, switching, updating, manual library installation, deleting local libraries, etc).

As usual, please report any issues or bugs in the forum or open a Github issue where appropriate.

Gateway app Updated to v8.10

The Pi Gateway software is now at v8.10, this release is mainly a new feature release and also it fixes some issues. You can view a list of all the changes in the official release notes. Here are some quick highlights:

Node/overridable Settings

If you’d like a particular global setting (from settings.json5) to be overridable in a node (for instance minimum voltage for battery powered nodes) you can now do so in metrics.js by using the new settings section under exports.motes, note that the included settings must match the name in settings.json5 or they will be ignored. Example from exports.motes.MotionMote:

imageThen on nodes of that type, the setting can now be set a custom value:
image

Wifi RadioThermostat CT50 IP setting support

Specific code for the CT50 was updated to support a new IP setting in the UI. This allows the user to override and set the IP of a thermostat on the node page, thus enabling having multiple thermostats with different IPs in the app:
image

New Setting Types

This enables more user friendly settings. Supported types are jQuery mobile HTML5 defaults, and examples of how to use these are found in the settings.json5 file:

  • checkbox – for true/false settings
  • number
  • email
  • password – obsoletes setting.password:true/false
  • range – min, max
  • default (no type) is text

A few examples using new types:
image

Email attachments

The sendEmail function in gateway.js has a new parameter where you can pass the URL of an attachment to include in sent emails: global.sendEmail = function(SUBJECT, BODY, **ATTACHMENTS**). Example email with attachment:
image

Scheduled events time remaining & datetime

Scheduled events now show time remaining until they will run, and the datetime when that happens:
image

Sunset/sunrise API for events

Based on suncalc, this node API allows creating events that run at various times during the day based on calculation of the sun position. A few examples are:

  • sunrise
  • sunset
  • solarNoon
  • goldenHour
  • dusk
  • dawn

To calculate these events, the latitude/longitude coordinates can be provided on the general settings page:

image

New All-Events page which shows all scheduled and disabled events:

image

Modified main menu:

  • removed the Exit item (redundant)
  • added app version:
    image

RSSI is now a metric and logged/graphed by default:

imageimage

Low Battery Voltage

Warning icon now blinks in/out over the node icon:
image

As always, when you update:

SwitchMote with single 16A relay

SwitchMote  and SwitchMote PSU are now available with a single 16A relay, instead of dual 10A relays. I realize this is most often the case that a second relay is not really necessary, except when replacing dual gang switches with a single gang SwitchMote, so I found this higher rating relay which can be soldered as shown in the guide. I also added the option to get it with a single 10A relay since most light applications now use either CFLs or LEDs and 16 amps are not really necessary for such small loads.

This new 16A relay requires removing two of the leads to make it fit the SwitchMote PCB, this is also added to the guide:

Worth noting here that the dual relay SwitchMote (a.k.a. 2x10A) is now the official kit that deprecates the older single 5A relay SwitchMote – that one has been discontinued and will only be available by special order.

Moteino R6 released

After Moteino R4 has been the long running champion of its lineup, and R5 has had a brief period of glory, Moteino has now been shipping for the past week at revision R6!

Wait, what happened to R5 which was never announced you ask?
Well R5 was mainly a transceiver layout change from R4, it also added a u.FL RF connector (which is now offered in the shop) and SMA connector “helper” pads, and few other minor layout changes, nothing too significant and otherwise identical to R4. Customers were now getting HCW and LoRa radios on the same Moteino PCB instead of separate PCBs for HW and LoRa.

However in R6 there are more important changes:

  • CW transceiver layout has been added in addition to the RFM69/LoRa layout, which means that the whole spectrum of RFM69 and LoRa radios are supported. Note that W and HW, while still in the shop, are no longer available as an option for MoteinoR6 – they are replaced by CW and HCW (which are 100% equivalent from a software and features perspective, but smaller!)
  • supported transceivers: RFM69CW, RFM69HCW, RFM95/96/LoRa
  • in addition to this, RFM12B is now also usable (though not sold) with Moteino R6 because of the new CW pads. Note that the RFM12B library is still usable but no longer actively developed or supported
  • a delay cap was added to DTR to avoid situations where the Moteino never wakes from an ultra low power state – this has been mentioned and discussed in the forum
  • u.FL pads kept for those who want to connect a pigtail instead of straight coax or the provided monopole wire antenna
  • the Trace Antenna variant reflects all these changes as well except it’s connected to the onboard PCB antenna and does not require an external antenna

Here are RF connector options now possible on the Moteino, all these RF connectors are available in the shop for convenience:

 

DHL Express for international orders

Good news for international customers!
After a period of integration and API testing, DHL Express is now available for international orders!

Pricing on DHL shipments is dynamically fetched at checkout and ranges typically from $25 to $40 to most EU countries. In almost every case it will beat the USPS pricing of PRIORITY ($33 to most countries) and it totally obsoletes USPS EXPRESS ($60 for most destinations). The transit time is typically 4 days to western EU and about 5 days to eastern EU. Most other places should expect a similar transit duration. There will always be flawless full tracking to the destination address, as opposed to postal tracking which is only available to a few countries that have agreements with USPS and has recently been unexpectedly removed from countries like France, Italy, Denmark and others.

USPS will continue to be available as flat rate service. The big disadvantage of USPS for international shipments is that there is an exchange to the destination country’s postal system, and in many cases these government run postal systems are poor at best. This sometimes results in delays, invalid package routing, invalid or confusing or out of order tracking (if any), bad customs handling and overall poor customer experience – not because USPS didn’t do its part. But because countries like Germany (the irony is the Deutsche Post owns DHL!) or Italy have very poor and anal customs which are nothing but deterrents for using the regular post for shipping.

With DHL all this is a thing of the past because DHL is one of the (if not the) best (and fastest) courier service available. It handles the customs clearance brokerage for the end customer (sounds like it may add a fee for this service in some places) but the experience you get is incomparable to that of dealing with the local post office. International buyers still have to pay import taxes as required by your country laws.

This is still considered to be a Beta release and while integration and automation continues to be implemented in the backend and some details ironed out, you are encouraged to report any bugs or issues or provide any feedback for improvement. Hopefully DHL will improve shipping experience for those customers who opt for and are willing to pay for the better service!

WeatherShield R2 released

UPDATE: A sample RFM69 sketch for WeatherShield R2 is posted here.

WeatherShield is now at R2 and although the PCB is very similar to R1 there are some significant differences. The R1 used to have a BMP180 until Bosch decided to stop making it. So R2 came about partly because of that reason, and is now shipped with a BME280 which includes all Temperature/Humidity/Pressure readings all in 1 sensor. This sensor is pretty popular it seems so hopefully the supply will be plenty for a long time.

Here’s a look at R2:

dsc_9859dsc_9860

And the schematic:schematic

Notice a few changes:

  • The voltage monitor circuit is now without a mosfet – this was removed and a resistor was added (the angled resistor) to tie the circuit permanently to A7. The old pads are still there so including the mosfet as on R1 is an option if someone really wants it.
  • there is now a solder jumper to allow disconnecting the battery monitor from A7
  • The Si7021 pads are still there if you’d like to add that sensor yourself

The board will idle at around 3.5uA when the sensor is put to sleep because of the voltage monitor. That’s still very low power but if you want 100nA instead and don’t care for battery monitoring, cut the jumper to A7. Bring your feedback in the forums!

MotionMote R3 with BME280 & Panasonic PIRs

The MotionMote is now available with optional BME280 sensors and Panasonic PIR ultra low power sensors (the EKMB1201111: 5m 2uA, white). When you opt for the Panasonic PIR you get that instead of the chinese HC-SR501 with the appropriate enclosure front cover and required acrylic standoff. The guide explains how to use the standoff and switch the PIR input voltage from battery to regulated 3.3v from the Moteino:

DSC_9826DSC_9823

The MotionMote sample sketch was updated to include BME280 code support, but it’s commented out (will require a 3rd party library to read the sensor). If you get the BME280, make sure to uncomment the BME280 related code lines.

Although expensive, this PIR allows running on less than 10uA of idle current draw. Who thought that less power costs more huh! When assembled these will look like this:

DSC_9805

The OLED variant of the kit might be available soon as well, I will update the product page with that option when/if it does. That allows using this kit as a battery operated Moteino with a nifty OLED display for any general purpose use on your wireless IoT network. Here is that at a glance next to the regular HC-SR501 PIR based MotionMote.