Author Topic: low volume custom pcb enclosure  (Read 11061 times)

executivul

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #30 on: February 03, 2017, 02:59:21 PM »
If only it could produce the tiny traces needed for SMD parts....
0.1-0.15 mm wide isolation, so you can go for 0.2mm wide pad/track with 0.2mm in between, that's at least what I tested with cheap Chinese 0.1mm 10deg v-tips.

I use a Philips 1600W (2hp?) home cyclonic vacuum cleaner, with an extended intake hose, with the exhaust hepa removed and instead output is connected to a tube venting outside(3d printed part again). All it's inside a thick plastic bag, no leaking inside, exhaust is 65mm, intake is 40mm, all negative pressure. I hand vacuum following the mill, using my 60000rpm spindle the circuit you saw above took about 2 and a half minutes to isolate and 2 minutes to drill.

TomWS

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #31 on: February 08, 2017, 09:47:00 AM »
On the topic of custom PCB enclosure, here's one I just completed for an RF Switch Control point.  This enclosure was designed to handle a generic 60x80mm perf board that I bought in bulk a while ago.  It's a handy size and I can take the basic design and add whatever mods I need for connector access, etc to a one-off design and print.  As you can see in the first picture, this took 6 hours 45 minutes to print, but I started it when I left my office last night.  This morning I've got a completed enclosure.

Material cost for this enclosure?  28.5 meters of 1.75mm PLA = approximately $0.81.

Tom
EDIT: AND it's in Carolina Blue!  8)

perky

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2017, 09:58:47 AM »
Oh you're only going to make me buy one!  :o

joelucid

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2017, 11:07:04 AM »
Do I see an espgw in there, Tom?  ;)

TomWS

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #34 on: February 08, 2017, 11:55:53 AM »
Do I see an espgw in there, Tom?  ;)
You do see a Node MCU ESP8266 and an old Moteino I salvaged from my  breadboarding collection.  The Moteino is just being used as an OOK transmitter, the control point controls those nifty 433MHz on/off switches that I bought a year and a half ago  :D

Having said that, I'll probably use the same enclosure to house my espgw (once I have one running)...  with minor mods to change mounting bosses.

Tom


msjfb

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #35 on: February 08, 2017, 02:31:07 PM »
A note of caution! The world of 3D printing can be highly addictive !!!

After about a year of thinking about it I purchased a printer (kit) late fall, with the specific intention of building my own enclosures.
I figured I could do this in a couple of weeks...  ::) I was achieving very good test prints, but...

I quickly got caught up in all the aspects of this technology and as a retired EE with a career in software I just had to understand all that was going on...
So first came a number of add-ons: high performance heatbed, Octoprint on Raspberry Pi with web cam for remote monitoring, control and stand-alone printing, etc.

Now that I was happy with the 'physical' stuff, I started looking into the software: lots of time getting to understand Marlin (Open source, kind of a mess) and lots and lots of trials with every 'slicer' program out there.

Then came testing and choosing printing materials: there are literally hundreds of different materials available. For enclosures you are looking for accurate dimensions, and UV resistant if it is to be installed outside.

And finally I realized that I needed to master a good CAD software program if I really wanted to do my own stuff: enter the FUSION 360 (Autodesk) learning curve !

3 months into this and a major backlog of my Moteino projects, I am just about ready to start on my enclosures.

My objective is to model all the possible parts that can go into an enclosure: moteino, battery + holder, power shield, Mighty boost,etc.
This way I can play around positioning the parts, and all standoffs, cutoffs, etc. will be done automatically.

Have a look at the www.thingiverse.com site for an idea of what people are building with these low cost 3D printers.

François



ChemE

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #36 on: February 08, 2017, 02:40:11 PM »
Sounds somewhat familiar.  When you're an engineer all the world is your oyster!

TomWS

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #37 on: February 08, 2017, 02:47:09 PM »
Sounds somewhat familiar.  When you're an engineer all the world is your oyster!
I would say "When you're an Engineer, you are cursed to fall further behind with every new idea..."

The good news is, now that I'm retired, 'behind' doesn't mean much anymore, and the 'behinder' I get!  :)

Tom

executivul

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #38 on: February 09, 2017, 03:05:17 AM »
@TomWS now get a Volcano with 0.8mm nozzle and get those times halved :)

TomWS

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #39 on: February 09, 2017, 07:46:45 AM »
@TomWS now get a Volcano with 0.8mm nozzle and get those times halved :)
Gee, just when I was thinking of getting a 0.25 nozzle so I could make finer gears...  Hmmmm, SO many choices.

'Volcano' huh?  It boggles the mind.

Thanks,
Tom

Felix

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #40 on: February 09, 2017, 08:29:38 AM »
I like what prusa did with their multi color printing option, brilliant.
I wonder if the same concept could be applied to multi nozzle, I was thinking about multi-head microscopes that just spin around conveniently. Perhaps some inner bulk printing could be done with large nozzles than the fine detail on the outside with the small ones. I guess each layer would have to be printed in both so the structure grows uniformly. It's probably just a crazy idea.

ChemE

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #41 on: February 09, 2017, 10:51:28 AM »
I like what prusa did with their multi color printing option, brilliant.
I wonder if the same concept could be applied to multi nozzle, I was thinking about multi-head microscopes that just spin around conveniently. Perhaps some inner bulk printing could be done with large nozzles than the fine detail on the outside with the small ones. I guess each layer would have to be printed in both so the structure grows uniformly. It's probably just a crazy idea.

Makes sense to me.  Multi-tool CNC routers have spindles that operate the exact same way too.

WhiteHare

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #42 on: February 10, 2017, 02:20:33 PM »
@TomWS now get a Volcano with 0.8mm nozzle and get those times halved :)

Was it the Volcano you used to print this front panel?

It really does appear that it would be blazing fast, and the printing artifacts have an almost artistic look to them.   8)

executivul

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #43 on: February 10, 2017, 05:02:01 PM »
Yes. I exclusively use 0.8mm Volcano on my Sunhokey (Prusa I3 clone). I need the speed, accuracy is enough for what I need. All these panels will receive laser cut faces looking like brushed steel, the printed parts shall be hidden to the naked eye :)

LE. unfortunately my crappy K40 laser had some issues and I've started redesigning the gantry from scratch which is taking A LOT more time than I've expected  >:(
Piece of advice: always get the largest machine you can afford, especially if you're going to buy cheap Chinese sh*t! The machine will not be accurate across all the working surface, so if you try to push the limits you'll be in trouble! If your working surface is twice the size you need you can remain well inside the good accuracy zone. I'm still sorry I didn't fork out for a good 30cm/50cm laser which came with air assist, linear rails, good extractor from the box. I've added all this myself and now with the new gantry I should get the same results for 1/2 of the price but the time taken to get there is priceless...
 
« Last Edit: February 10, 2017, 05:13:36 PM by executivul »

stern0m1

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Re: low volume custom pcb enclosure
« Reply #44 on: February 20, 2017, 09:13:44 PM »
There's the possibility to make silicone molds for less than huge volume production. They can still produce a very nice case at a fraction of the cost of metal molds.
I am making a case right now for another project, silicone molds, and I'm very eager to see the outcome. The design and tweaks and proto prints/adjustments has been running for a few months now, not exactly very fast but it's a somewhat complex case. I will talk about it and details when/if it will be ready :)

Anyway for amateur level casing, you can use makercase to make some very cheap and easy lasercut-able cases. I used that for all cases I offer with MotionMote, SonarMote etc. They look very decent and from a little distance they look quite professional.

I have several Moteino type/sizes now so which one would it make sense to make a case for?
If I make one for the small Moteino then people will ask for a bigger one for MoteinoMEGA. If I make one that accomodates both then they will complain it's unnecessarily big for use with regular Moteinos.... the endless debates of usability vs manufacturing cost :)
Then I'd have to sell thousands before I get my upfront money back, not really a model I like to run by :)

Is this method commercially available? I cant find any info online. Thanks
It all started with a Moteino!